Can Dune be done? Should Dune be done? Bringing Long Books to the Screen

herbert sandworm dune
If you walk without rhythm, you won’t attract the worm.

Until the last generation, when Peter Jackson proved The Lord of the Rings could not only be made into a successful film — but be so off-the-charts good that it took home 11 Oscar Awards — it was unheard of to succeed at translating most of the great sci-fi and fantasy epics of literature to the big screen.

That’s not for lack of trying. Larry McMurtry’s  Lonesome Dove book-to-film effort was a grand feat, but it’s the mini-series scale that made it work. The book is too big and involved to be made into one cinema-length film. Nowadays it would be at least a film trilogy, but I don’t think it needs a reboot — the 1989 miniseries is already a flawless snapshot of the last gasps of the Western Expansion. So they could make a new movie with these characters, yes, but I’d say it’s time to move on and  tackle other works of genre literature. (Also, who’s going to try improve on Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Duval?)

Watership Down is another epic tale in a brick-sized book, but it’s a hard sell, being entirely from the point of view of rabbits. And it’s absolutely not for children: the themes are mature and often mesmerizingly frightening. (The rabbits even have their own word for being stuck in a “mesmerizingly frightened” state — called Tharn –). The 1978 animated feature has its fans, but most people who’ve loved the book pretend the “movie” doesn’t exist. (Seriously, it’s like a long scary drug trip.) Hazel’s troop of rabbits could now be done with puppets, animatronics, or CGI — instead of animation —  but the question here is “Why?” [pullquote]We’ve seen entire CGI movies like Avatar, and they can be lush and sweeping films, but it still remains that Watership Down must be seen at rabbit-height and from rabbit-eyes. [/pullquote]It would take a very special studio or director to take that on. This is probably why nobody is chasing this particular story at the moment.

Here’s a full length video of Watership Down, if you’re curious:

In  the Post-LOTR and Harry Potter world,  the densest, longest, and most involving books can come alive on film…with inspired directing, gobs of studio money (and little studio interference), the right acting ensemble, and legions of dedicated crew members. Not to mention a crack PR team dropping hints and teaser trailers to excite the fans. (See: anything in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.)

The key to adapting epic novels to the big screen, it seems, is respecting the source story. Behind the sets, Sir Ian McKellen (as Gandalf) would pace around Peter Jackson with this LOTR novels, saying, essentially, “Peter!That’s not how Tolkien wrote it!” This is probably one of the many interconnected reasons why Lord of the Rings, previously considered unfilmable, worked so well.

[pullquote position=”right”]It’s not that a script can’t deviate from a source, but the result should clearly be recognizable from it. Book fans will be waiting for certain beats, beloved details, fantastic settings worthy of a grand story, and most of all: a faithfulness of essence to its literary origins.[/pullquote]

There’s a line between slavishly book-faithful recreations (as in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone), and movies that recalls its novel by name only (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, AKA Blade Runner, or Lynch’s Dune).

So, yes, finally. We get to Dune. It’s been tackled several times, although none were recent enough to benefit from the current seamless FX at our disposal. (Which doesn’t excuse anything at all. Look back on the practical effects of Star Wars: A New Hope, or Raiders of the Lost Ark, and tell me those films failed — they don’t.)

david lynch dune
Lynch’s Dune – looks good, tastes bad.

Lynch’s 1984 Dune remains a problem, and its not from poor effects. It’s mainly that Lynch took Herbert’s book, tore a few pages he liked from it, and threw away the rest. It’s only “Dune” because the characters have the same names, there are Fremen and there are Sandworms, and Arrakis, the desert planet, is still called Dune. Otherwise, it’s a sprawling, sometimes grotesque mess, bearing little likeness to the story they aim to tell. I admit they got to the story’s conclusion just fine, but the path to get there was completely unorthodox. I know Lynch’s Dune has its fans, so I’ll let it lie.

scy fy dune
SyFy gives Dune a try. Definitely more Herbert, but definitely still wrong.

When SyFy made Frank Herbert’s Dune (2000) into a television miniseries, you can see there were many attempts made to be faithful to the book…but Sy Fy also took liberties in the telling. The main arguments I’ve heard seem to coalesce around the casting, that the actors didn’t look like the part, or didn’t act like the part. I’d say in both versions they got Jessica right, and Chani, and Irulan, for that matter, but the men’s roles are hit or miss. I think they got a lot more right than wrong, and crafted a personable, sensible, enjoyable tale without a whisper of heart plugs.

In my grading system, I’d give Lynch’s Dune a D+. (While I thought it was overall atrocious, he got a few things right, and that’s where the + comes in.) I’d give SyFy’s Dune a nice fair B score. It crumples a little as time marches on, but at least it’s recognizably Dune. SyFy even went on to combine Dune Messiah and Children of Dune as a second mini-series, which was ambitious, welcome, and mostly effective.  That one gets a B as well; maybe a   B+ — I’d have to see it again.

jodorowksy dune
Jodorosky’s Dune. Third time’s a charm?

A lot of people mention Jodorowsky’s Dune (2013), which isn’t actually a movie. It’s more like an appetizer for a film, or a promise of Dune. You can watch the movie-length documentary for $3 on Amazon, or check out the free trailers on IMDb. However, if you watch the video, you can’t help but notice that it’s even stranger than Lynch’s version. There’s a lot of people who want to see this one picked up by the studios, but I’m not one of them. I want to see the story the way Herbert saw it in his mind’s eye.

The time is right to try Dune again, using a well-funded production studio, a director who is comfortable with an epic scale,  and detailed sets in grand desert locations. I want to see world-building. Toss in some smart humor, dynamic ensemble casting, and of course, magnificent sandworms: make me long to be a rider. [pullquote position=”left”]The movie should be a visual delight, engulfing the audience so much you’ll think you can smell the sietches, taste the spice, and feel the grit of sand, sand, sand.[/pullquote]

So, it’s exciting news that director Denis Villeneuve plans to try his hand at a multi-film Dune. He says he hopes to make Dune into the Star Wars movie he never saw. “Most of the main ideas of Star Wars are coming from Dune, so it’s going to be a challenge to [tackle] this,” Villeneuve said. “In a way, it’s Star Wars for adults. We’ll see.” (Read the Dune News page on IMDb.)

It ‘s a promising start. We’ll record the news for this Dune project as it comes along.

While you wait for the right version of Dune to thrill you, entertain yourself with Fatboy Slim’s song Weapon of Choice. The lyrics are definitely Dune-inspired, even if the setting isn’t. But watching Christopher Walken putzing  around an empty hotel is a whole lot of awesome by itself…

Which version of Dune is your favorite? Do you think it will be done right by Villeneuve?

Stan Lee – His Favorite Marvel Characters

Stan-Lee-spider-man-with-fans
Stan Lee with fans dressed as their favorite supes…with his true love: Spider-Man

There’s no doubt Stan Lee, often together with frequent co-inventor/artist Jack Kirby, created some of the most beloved, enduring, and influential superhero characters.  Without Lee, there would be no Marvel Universe, at least not with the faces by which we know it. [pullquote]Lee was a man with a mission of hope for millions of kids, giving a heroic voice to the underdogs, the alienated, and the disenfranchised.[/pullquote]

Here are a few of Lee’s apparent favorite superhero creations:

  1. Lee seemed to identify most with Spider-Man, an emotional, talkative, and sometimes naive teen. According to Quora: “Spider Man symbolizes the little guy and that appeals a great deal to Stan. I’m not saying that Stan doesn’t love any other creation because that isn’t true. He has love for all of his characters that he brought to life. I just think that Spider Man has a special place in his heart. If you look at some of the publications and advertisements you will see Stan with Spider Man quite often.”
    It doesn’t hurt that this character became the face of Marvel for many years.
  2. Dr. Banner/The Hulk -[pullquote position=”right”] Banner was a man tormented by an often violent inner volatility. His human form contained a man a science, characterized by rational  intellect — never knowing when he would lose his cool to become an overpowered child-like rage monster.[/pullquote] He’s the personification of the ultimate battle between the Id and the Ego. AV Club reports: “There’s definitely an element of wish fulfillment in the Hulk for readers that wish they could let themselves fully give in to their anger—my appreciation for the character developed during my closeted teenage years—but Lee and Kirby were clear early on that this was a curse for Banner rather than a gift.”
  3. Black Panther – At the height of the Civil Rights movement, Lee created the first eponymous African superhero, starting with King T’Chaka, eventually  passing the role to his son King T’Challa. [pullquote]A previously under-served, large section of the world’s population could finally find superheroes who looked like them — an entire paradisaical high-tech country of them, in fact — in the secret cities and unspoiled countryside of Wakanda.[/pullquote] The Rolling Stone reports: “An entire generation of children will now know that a black superhero, society, imagination and power can exist right alongside Peter Parker, Steve Rogers, and Bruce Wayne. An entire generation of children will not know what it feels like to not see themselves reflected back on costume racks, coloring books or movie screens. We’re at a pivotal time where these characters and stories are coming not out of permission or obligation, but necessity.”
  4. For The X-Men, as an ensemble, this might be cheating, but he loved these fleshed out characters, who tried to do the right thing in a world that didn’t want them. [pullquote position=”right”]They were flawed but regular people at heart, caught up in circumstances where they were forced to make a choice: to look out for regular humans, or to look out for fellow Mutants.[/pullquote] In theory, the choice should be easy (both sides could reap the rewards of working together), but in reality it was like forcing opposite poles of magnets to align. You can’t help but feel a sense of tragedy for both sides. As a child, I self-identified as a mutant, or perhaps as someone from another world, impersonating as a human. According to the AV Club the young mutants were “a bunch of awkward, uncertain outcasts, drawing strength from each other in order to get through life in a world that didn’t especially like them, who just happened to have superpowers to boot. For a pre-teen who often felt like the odd one out in school, it was a lightning bolt, a volcanic eruption that ripped open the pop culture I had been consuming and showed me the way to a different one, one that existed inside the pages of comics. The heroes were fascinatingly flawed, all of them given to social isolation in one form or another, and it spoke to me in a way few things have. The symbolism of the mutant heroes is powerful, which is why they’ve been used as an allegory for just about every marginalized group at this point (and were created by Lee with the express intent of functioning as such).”
[pullquote]This week, the galaxy lost a voice of vast imagination and fun, who held deeply felt humanitarian roots, shaping millions of young lives through the colorful comicbook medium. [/pullquote]He also influenced modern adults, bringing all-too-human characters to the big screen, reshaping the superhero landscape indelibly from anything we’d seen before. If you’ve enjoyed the 20+ film saga of the MCU, or the X-Men movies, you can’t help but be touched by Stan Lee’s contribution to entertainment, and feel a deeper understanding of ourselves.

We at RunPee love superheroes, clearly identifying with the underdogs who decided to do something for the world, even if it’s as simple as helping everyday people in small ways, one bladder at a time.

Here’s a couple of our recent Stan Lee articles, and one cool quiz: 

RIP Stan Lee – you will be missed

Quiz – Learn About Marvel Studio’s Great Stan Lee

Stan Lee – His Marvel Cameos are a Secret Character

Every Stan Lee Cameo in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

 

 

Quiz – Learn About Marvel Studio’s Great Stan Lee

We just heard (11/12/18) about the sad passing of legendary Marvel Comics superhero creator/movie co-producer Stan Lee, at the impressive age of 95.

Mr. Lee had so many influential superhero characters to his name: it’s impossible for anyone not to have been touched in some way by Spider-Man, The Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Black Panther, Dr. Strange, the X-Men, or any of the other flawed, fascinating characters he created for the Marvel Universe. Whereas DC penned impossible paragon superheroes like Superman and Wonder Woman, Lee’s Marvel creations had real-world problems, handling mature themes about friendship, love, family, alienation, and sacrifice.

Take this quiz to learn more about this outgoing, imaginative superhero genius and his achievements:

Stan Lee

RunPee sends loving wishes to Stan Lee’s family and hopes they can feel peace through this trying time. Mr.  Lee leaves behind a legacy previously unheard of in cinema — making a linked series of 20+ award-winning blockbuster movies — not to mention a  lifetime of extraordinary comic book creation.  Thank you for being our Guardian of the Galaxy. Rest In Peace, somewhere in the universe.

 

RIP Stan Lee – you will be missed

stan-lee-marvel-superhero
The Man. The Spider. And every other beloved Marvel superhero. Stan Lee, you will be missed.

We just heard today (11/12/18) about the passing of legendary Marvel Comics superhero creator and movie co-producer Stan Lee, at the age of 95.

Not only was he beloved for introducing the world to such enduring characters as as The Hulk, Thor, Black Panther, Dr. Strange, Spider-Man, Iron Man, and the X-Men (among many others), but he also appeared in some way in every Marvel movie, in vastly amusing cameos.

In a recent MCU massive movie rewatch this summer in New York to herald the coming of Ant Man & The Wasp, it’s reported [pullquote]the biggest laughs and moments of outrageous fan applause came during each Lee cameo.[/pullquote] His ritual appearances were always highly anticipated by legions of fans, and it was exciting when Lee and Marvel Studios confirmed a fan theory that all his tiny scenes added up to an ongoing arc for his own character as a Watcher Informant. (See link below to our article about his own MCU character.)

At this point, it’s known that Lee hated to fly, and preferred to shoot his upcoming movie scenes in batches. So we will probably see at least two post-mortem cameos next Spring: one for Captain Marvel in March, and in Avengers 4 (still untitled) in May.[pullquote position=”right”] It would be nice if at least one of those cameos had a little more meat to them, as a proper send-off to a beloved superhero creator.[/pullquote]

Something I think we can all feel pleased about is that just this last June, Mr. Lee (along with JK Rowling for Harry Potter and Joss Whedon for Buffy) was inducted into the Sci Fi & Fantasy Hall of Fame.  According to Screenrant, “previous inductees include the likes of Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Gene Roddenberry, Terry Pratchett, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien.” It’s a pleasure to realize Lee was alive to receive this rare and sought-after award.

Here are a few articles we wrote on RunPee about Stan Lee this past summer that you won’t want to have missed, including a video roundup of every Marvel Cinematic Universe cameo:

Stan Lee – His Marvel Cameos are a Secret Character

Every Stan Lee Cameo in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Guardians of the Galaxy Song – Guardians Inferno Video and Lyrics

Is Deadpool in the Avengers’ Universe?

RIP Mjölnir – Who Can Lift Thor’s Hammer?

Avengers Infinity War – Characters Missing in Action, Whereabouts Unknown

And here’s a link to all the movies articles tagged with Marvel on RunPee.com.

We send loving wishes to Stan Lee’s family and hope they can feel peace through this trying time. Mr.  Lee leaves behind a legacy previously unheard of in cinema — making a linked series of 20+ award-winning blockbuster movies — not to mention a  lifetime of extraordinary comic book creation.  Thank you for being our Guardian of the Galaxy. Rest In Peace, somewhere in the universe. 

 

Pixar Fast Fact Video – Easter Eggs in Incredibles 2

Incredibles is simply a great superhero film
Incredibles 2 is kinda incredible.

Be happy, Pixar fans, as the galaxy’s best animated superhero movie sequel is now available on DVD and Blu-Ray.

To remind  you how good Incredibles 2 is, I’m introducing you to a duo of video superheros themselves, the Super Carlin Brothers. These guys love Pixar, and came up with the mind-blowing, probably unlikely, but strangely fitting Pixar Theory, one that spans from the dawn of time (The Good Dinosaur) through to the far future (Wall-E). But this post isn’t about The Pixar Theory video (although you should see it). I’m just giving these dudes a call-out for their Incredibles 2 insights.

Remember, [pullquote]Pixar uses a winning combination of top notch animation; flawed, yet big-hearted characters; great ensemble chemistry; a quest structure; engaging pathos; and legit humor that may go right over kid’s heads, but adults will most certainly enjoy.[/pullquote] Incredibles 2 even takes charming their adult audience a step further, showing  animated characters drinking beer, something unseen on the big screen before, and normally reserved for someone like Homer on The Simpsons. (I don’t know why I’m so impressed with Mr. Incredible drinking beer. I suppose it’s fun to see heroes being less idealized and more human. I doubt Captain America drinks ale, but we’ve seen Iron Man sipping whiskey, and I’ll bet Thor loves himself a good mug of mead.)

Here’s the roughly 8 minute video about Pixar and Incredibles 2 for your enjoyment:

While you’re here, this 10 minute companion video argues that the Incredible family moved into Syndrome’s House in the sequel (the big bad from Incredibles 1, if you recall):

Here’s our catalog of Incredibles Movie Reviews and Articles on RunPee.com: 

All Incredibles Related Posts (click this link).

Just highlighting a few below:

Movie Rewatch – The First Incredibles

Incredibles 2 & the Success of Animated Movie Sequels

WTF: Pixar’s Bao Short Before Incredibles 2

Once More, with Ant Man. Why him, and why now?

ant man in the quantum realm
Wait. What? Where did everybody go?

With Ant Man & The Wasp now released on DVD and Blu-Ray, people are struck again with how this movie might tie in with the greater Marvel oeuvre, and wonder anew why the light-weight Ant Man 2 arrived so closely after the heavy ending of Infinity War.

— Spoilers ahead for Avengers Infinity War and Ant Man & The Wasp —

Here’s a roundup of some intriguing articles addressing Ant Man, the Quantum Realm, and some conjecture about how to undo The Snap:

Do you have any thoughts on how things could wrap up for Avengers 4, coming out next summer? At least we’ve got time to puzzle, conjecture, and, yes,  re-watch the 20 previous movies for scraps of clues. Feel free to comment below with your ideas. I promise to respond.

MCU Trailer News: 

First Captain Marvel Trailer Finally Drops

Avengers 4 Trailer Hints and Rumors

Review of The Deadpool Before Christmas – A PG-13 Version – New Footage, New Film

Remember, he sees you when you're sleeping.
Be good this year, kids, or you’ll get something very naughty in your stocking.

Santa Claus has a super duper maxi big treat for us this Christmas, with an almost-new Deadpool 2 arriving in theaters on December 21. Ryan Reynolds is back in the red suit, just like Santa, re-shooting 15 minutes of original footage, dubbing creatively subversive, yet clean lines for the “new” film — even adding a brand new character to his pantheon. We’ve got a good idea who this could be, which I’ll get to in a moment.

New Deadpool Footage

According to ComingSoon.net, screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick recently took part in an interview with /Film…and shared what the writers had to say about the upcoming Deadpool 2 PG-13 cut.

“We definitely shot new stuff,” revealed Wernick. “And recently too. After Deadpool 2 came out and we were all sitting around, we came to it less about the idea of let’s make a PG-13 movie and more, ‘Let’s talk a little bit about Deadpool.’ We were kicking around some ideas and then I think it was Ryan [Reynolds] who had the great framing device and we all got excited and went to the studio. They said, ‘Yeah, let’s do it. Fire up the cameras.’

“I think it’s not only going to appeal to kids, but also to people who love Deadpool,” Wernick said. “I think it’s subversive enough and fun and creative and something that only Deadpool could do. So I think it’s going to be a real joy for not only a whole new audience, but also an audience that has seen and loved the Deadpool movies.”

They promise the film’s basic plot remains unchanged, possibly adding a Princess Bride type of storytelling bookend, if this Tweet can be believed:

What? Princess Bride in Deadpool?

Seeing an adult Fred Savage called back in a detailed recreation of his old bedroom from The Princess Bride has fans salivating for more. What could be better than the Man in Black crosspollinating with the Man in Red?

This might be seen as a way to make nice with Disney, who recently acquired Marvel Studios, which in turn owns Deadpool. In no universe could we say that Deadpool, with his snarky potty-mouth and sexual…proclivities…would nest easily in the Disney brand. But since Disney isn’t stupid (James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy knee-jerk firing aside), they can’t possibly be thinking of sanitizing the future of their money-making R-rated blockbuster property. However, adding a “clean” and fun sideline of the Merc with the Mouth sounds like a true Christmas treat.

I, for one, will be there with (jingle) bells on, getting brand-new Peetimes for all the good boys and girls of the world. Remember kids, Santa Wade is always watching, and he likes it when you’re naughty.  🙂

Movie Review – Deadpool 2

Deadpool 2 Outtakes, Bloopers, and Banned Jokes

Every Hilarious Deadpool 2 Trailer

Guardians of the Galaxy Ex-Director James Gunn to Direct Suicide Squad 2

A most excellent cameo, eh?

There are perfect cameos and then there’s Mike Myers’ cameo as Ray Foster in Bohemian Rhapsody.

I honestly didn’t recognize Myers during the movie. It wasn’t until after I saw it — when I was adding Peetimes — that I noticed his credit listing on the IMDb.

If you don’t know why this is such an excellent cameo, then maybe you forgot this:

Movie Review – Bohemian Rhapsody – Queen Will Rock You

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Ex-Director James Gunn to Direct Suicide Squad 2

We are still Groot.

In a surprise move that, in hindsight, should not be so surprising, DC snapped up erstwhile Marvel director James Gunn.

The director who helmed the beloved Guardians of the Galaxy films was fired last July from GOTG Vol3 for offensive Twitter jokes posted over a decade ago, stirring up ire and confusion from legions of fans. The entire GOTG cast got involved, tweeting support for Gunn and asking Disney to reconsider their stance. One actor, Dave Bautista (Drax), stated he would quit the MCU if Marvel didn’t use Gunn’s script for Vol3.

It’s been an emotional road for fans since then. I was at the San Diego Comic Con the day Gunn was slated to speak, and it hit the entire convention like a blow. He didn’t appear at all, which made a lot of sense: this knee-jerk move most probably broke his heart. GOTG was his baby, and he made Marvel a lot of money. [pullquote]Gunn took a little-known cosmic corner of the Marvel Comics universe, one with a walking tree and a talking raccoon, and made a joyously exuberant space epic that even non-geeks adore.[/pullquote]  He’s so intimately connected to his characters that he was brought in for Avengers: Infinity War to write all the Guardians’ lines, keeping the tone tied to the GOTG flicks.

Word is that Marvel, now owned by Disney, will still use Gunn’s script for the conclusion to his trilogy, but this hasn’t been confirmed. The feature was slated in the MCU roster for 2020, but is now considered on haitus. In other words, no one knows anything. There might not even BE a third Guardians film, after all is said and done.

Which leads us to the DC Extended Universe. Suicide Squad was intended to be DC’s equivalent to the MCU’s Guardians movies, with rollicking tunes and irreverent characters who are “something good, something bad: a little bit of both.” Unfortunately, SS really wasn’t very good, and became another dead end in DC’s bid to catch up with the MCU.

Gunn coming on board will change things. With the Wonderwoman films course correcting the entire franchise, and the anticipation awaiting December’s Aquaman film, this could be just the kick in the pants DC needed to compete for the hearts of fans. They certainly made a smart call to add Gunn to their universe.  He’s expected to bring to Suicide Squad 2 what he lent to the Guardians films: a freshness, good tunes, witty dialog, and a rousing sense of adventurous fun.

Where’s the American Flag in First Man?

Much ado has been made about the omission of the moment when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted the American flag on the moon in the movie First Man. So what’s the deal?

Here’s what the director had to say about this decision:

“It surprised me because there are so many things that we weren’t able to focus on not only during the lunar EVA but in the entirety of Apollo 11. Just by the nature of the story we were telling, we just couldn’t go into every detail. So our through-line became, especially at this part of the movie where it’s the final emotional journey for Neil, what were the private, unknown moments of Neil on the moon? The flag was not a private, unknown moment for Neil. It’s a very famous moment and it wasn’t Neil alone. We included the famous descent down the ladder because that’s him alone, literally first feeling what it’s like to be on the moon. But other than that, we only wanted to focus on the unfamous stuff on the moon. So we don’t go into the phone call with Nixon, we don’t go into the scientific experiments, we don’t go into reentry.”

Regardless of how you feel about the exclusion of this scene, there are numerous people who (at least pretend) to care deeply about it. So much so, they told blatant lies that would be clear to anyone who’s even seen the movie trailer. It’s been said the American flag is deliberately never shown — this is false.

Here are three images (below) showing the American flag in a 2 1/2 minute First Man trailer. The movie is 2 hours and 21 minutes long, so they’re on pace to show the flag 169.2 times! (I’m sure it will be much less because, as they say: sample size matters.)

First Man Flag

First Man Flag

First Man Flag

First Man‘s Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle is known for stories of intense personal sacrifice in the struggle to achieve, like La La Land and Whiplash. The title First Man really sums up what this movie is about: an individual struggling against his fears, technology, physical limitations, and most of all, gravity.

Chazelle added:

“In First Man I show the American flag standing on the lunar surface, but the flag being physically planted into the surface is one of several moments of the Apollo 11 lunar EVA that I chose not to focus upon. To address the question of whether this was a political statement, the answer is, “No.” My goal with this movie was to share with audiences the unseen, unknown aspects of America’s mission to the moon. Particularly Neil Armstrong’s personal saga and what he may have been thinking and feeling during those famous few hours.”

Armstrong’s sons, Rick and Mark, wrote in a statement:

“This story is human and it is universal. Of course, it celebrates an America achievement. It also celebrates an achievement for all mankind, (emphasis added) as it says on the plaque Neil and Buzz left on the moon. It is a story about an ordinary man who makes profound sacrifices and suffers through intense loss in order to achieve the impossible,”

Conclusion
There are those who think that everyone who disagrees with their perspective on patriotism has some agenda, or is behind some conspiracy to corrupt, what they feel, is the only true expression of patriotism. But, sometimes these decisions are based on artistic expression, or as is more often the case, didn’t notice that there was anything patriotic there in the first place.

Read Next: Where’s the Flag? Opinion, by polyGeek

Movie Review – First Man