Tears in the Rain – RIP to Icon Rutger Hauer

rutger hauer
RIP to an Icon

Rutger Hauer sadly passed away July 19th, 2019. Hauer was a character actor best known for genre films.  His most famous and beloved role was the replicant (a type of cyborg) Roy Batty in the 1982 movie Blade Runner.  If Hauer had done nothing else, he would still be fondly remembered for this performance

It is said there are only so many basic story types.  Blade Runner can be seen as a take on Frankenstein: man vs his creation. 

The three replicants in the film seek vengeance against Eldon Tyrell, the rich scientist who created them.  They want longer lifespans than just the four years they are given.  Theirs are close to ending.  Although the replicants are the antagonists in the film, Hauer’s final speech makes it impossible not to feel sympathy for their plight.  Roy Batty’s final speech is made even more incredible by the fact that Hauer improvised the entire thing.  It wasn’t in the original script.  

Essential Rutger Hauer performances include: the movies Ladyhawke, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and The Hitcher.  To my knowledge, his last widely celebrated big screen performance was the title role in 2011’s violent instant cult classic Hobo With a Shotgun.  It was deeply disappointing that the filmmakers did not find a way to bring him back for Blade Runner 2049.  

Hauer will be missed, but his legacy in sci-fi  and fantasy cinema history is secure.  

Here’s Rutger Hauer’s beautiful, iconic Tears in the Rain speech from the 1982 Blade Runner:

 

To make sure you don’t miss essential moments like Roy Batty’s speech, always use the RunPee app.  We’ll have Peetimes for Ad Astra, Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker, and all your other upcoming sci-fi favorites.  You can also keep up with the latest movie news and reviews by following us on Twitter @RunPee and liking us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RunPee/.

Blade Runner: 2049 review

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Blade Runner: 2049 review

This was almost an awesome movie. It was a worthy sequel that felt “right”, like settling in after a long break (of actual decades — in both real and movie time) to catch up on old events. Even the new characters seemed to carry echoes of previous incarnations. Hans Zimmer created a track with many beats evocative of the original *Blade Runner* score. The noir notes were missing, but it felt familiar and fresh all at once. You could feel the fingerprints of Ridley Scott all over the production, too.

The characters were compelling (except the central villain, unfortunately, whose motivations to be ‘bad’ were unclear, and gave us at least one strangely gratuitous scene). Ryan Gosling — the new Blade Runner — offered a purposefully subtle performance, acting mainly through very small facial and postural movements. Robin Wright gave us a law officer whose motivations and character alignment are unclear for most of the film, lending a sense of disorientation and hopelessness that matches the setting of the blasted, ruined Earth. The boss’s henchwoman had an interesting role, whose tone changed radically over the course of the story; her fighting style was used to devastating effect. And Harrison Ford? I didn’t think he had to stretch much. I’m glad Ford was back; he looks great, and he was used organically, but he seems tired. In this role, it works. Deckard is tired.

Almost all the characters underplay their roles (a clear directorial choice), and things move glacially for 90% of the film. The action scenes, by contrast, are lightning fast, coupled with set pieces that fit well into the universe we’ve seen, without feeling like a repeat in any way. The CGI was seamless, except where something is clearly intended to be CGI (you’ll see what I mean).

Is this a violent film? Well, it’s a lot like the other *Blade Runner*, so yes in moments, and not at all in others. Is there humor? No. I smiled at a couple of things in a sardonic way, or at mild nods to things that came in the previous film. Romance? Again, there’s about as much as we’ve seen before, with a few tender beats snatched from the grip of a mostly horrifying reality. Earth is now even more of a desolate wasteland. It’s all very beautiful, stylish, and lovingly filmed, and quite, quite grim. This movie definitely puts the ‘dis’ in dystopian. 🙂

One thing this film was: weird. There were things that seemed weird JUST to be weird, in a cool and visually arresting way. Maybe an extended version will explain some of it away, but I honestly don’t think that’s necessary. It’s the future, and while things are not so good in this future, society and culture keeps ticking along in new ways.

There were also a lot of symbolic images. I want to rattle off a bunch of them, but won’t. You’ll enjoy finding things yourself. I’d recommend doing a re-watch of the original film (the Director’s Cut, to be specific), just to make sure you catch the moody callbacks to the first Blade Runner.

There are a few other things that would be spoilers to mention, and it’s probably a spoiler to say there even are spoilers, so I’ll stop there. I suggest that you use the recommended Peetimes we’ve provided so you don’t miss those moments.

In an odd note, I have never in my life seen a more quiet and still audience — quite a feat for a 2 hour and 42 minute film. Things onscreen were very silent for long stretches, and nobody in the theater rustled, coughed, laughed, gasped, or even breathed, as far as I could tell. It’s a testament to how invested people were in this sequel. Interestingly enough, most of the audience on opening night were older people. There were very few young men and women present. Was this an audience of people who saw the original Blade Runner in the theaters the first time? Seems likely.

This isn’t a story by Philip K. Dick per se, but they do give him a reference credit at the end of the film. It’s very much his ouvre, in a sense. He likes to ask: Who are we? Are we our memories? Who has a soul? Thoughtfully, these questions remain ours to answer.

One question is put to rest though…is Deckard a replicant? You’ve probably decided this on your own long ago, but now you’ll know for sure.

Very enjoyable – see this on the big screen to catch all the minute details, setting nuances, and build up in tone. Now. Don’t miss it, if you liked the original Blade Runner in any way. Hey, tears in the rain…

Movie Review – Inception (No Spoilers)

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Right down the line from acting to directing to writing to musical score to effects, this movie is top notch. In some cases brilliant. There’s not a weak link to be found.

There are very few movies that twist and turn between action and drama with Gatling gun speed yet remain mostly comprehensible. I said mostly, because everyone in the theater is going to walk out asking, “What just happened?”

Where most movies that try to mix a complex plot with action fail is that characters do things for unknown reasons. Or they do things and we don’t understand what it is that they are doing. With Inception it’s always clear what they are doing and why they are doing it. But what it means is always a debatable.

A friend that I saw this movie with summed it up perfectly, saying “This movie will be this generation’s Blade Runner.” This coming from a huge Blade Runner fan. I couldn’t agree more. Based on reviews and all the positive things that people are saying in the social media sphere, Inception will have a hugely successful theater run. And you will very likely want to see it again on DVD because it needs multiple viewings to get your head wrapped around it.

There is no doubt that Inception will garner a cultist following. The only downside I see from this is the inevitable copies it will spawn that will, for the most part, suck. Such is the price of a ground breaking movie. (Don’t worry: you don’t have to see these movies. I do.)

You can read a full review of Inception at MovieMikes.com.