A Novice Rocky Review

rocky and adrian
Rocky — a love story.

I’d never seen the original 1976 Rocky in the past, because it seemed to be a “boxing” movie, and watching people hit each other into a bloody mess has never been my bag. Somewhere along the line I watched Rocky III, which was a decent enough film. It was sad and then triumphant. But I never became a Rocky fan. I did see Rocky IV, but thought that one wasn’t good, and then gave up on the whole thing as more decades of Rocky  and Rocky-adjacent films passed me by.

With Creed II killing it in theaters, all the Rocky movies have been re-playing on TV, so I DVRed I-III for a newbie review. I can’t quite call it a Virgin Review, since I did see two of the eight films in the franchise (although if you ask me for any details, all I remember is III is the sad one and IV is the one with the blonde Russian boxer.)

[pullquote]I figured it was time to see what the fuss was about with Rocky the First.[/pullquote] I recently watched Jaws this summer, to prep for The Meg, and thought Jaws was truly an A+ film. I was too young to appreciate Jaws when it came out, thinking it a horror monster movie, when it really is not. It’s about three men and what they are made of when it counts. (Jaws is a perfect film. I gave it an A+  and posted a glowing rewatch review here.)

Well, Rocky is not really a boxing movie. The cold open shows Sylvester Stallone in a match, but we don’t see any more fighting until the end with the big champion-ship match. The plot is really more about this somewhat under-educated man with an unappealing job of collecting loan debts. He’s rough around every edge, but as you watch, you can sense he’s also so much more: he loves animals; is enamored with the shy bookish woman at the pet store; he tries to help a young girl on the streets, and, most tellingly, doesn’t break the thumb of the man he’s ordered to hurt when collecting a debt. Rocky also loves music. He fights because it’s the one thing he feels he’s really good at. [pullquote]He’s as insecure as everyone else seems to be in the story. One could argue Rocky is more about overcoming your self-loathing than fighting.[/pullquote]

More than being a sports movie, it’s a love story and a drama. The scenes where Rocky tries to bring Adrian out of her shell are unusual: he likes the quiet girl that doesn’t speak words if she can help it. He gave her enough self-confidence to tell off her abusive brother, in a wonderfully acted and taut scene. I don’t understand why Rocky is even friends with Paulie, but I think we are given to understand Rocky likes everyone, and doesn’t hold their personality defects against them. What a rare trait, and something to consider in our own lives.

[pullquote position=”right”]Rocky is also clearly a drama. The two fight scenes are more efficient than gripping, and I have no problem with that.  But the scenes that truly stick out show Rocky with coach Mickey, Rocky with Paulie, and Rocky with his strangely sympathetic loan shark.[/pullquote] The one big scene with Coach, played in an astoundingly profound, yet gruff way, needs to be seen once, then seen again. It’s sorrowful, hopeful AND hopeless, and features two significant monologues, spoken to a closed door in one case, and then from listening alone in a stairwell for the second. This turns into a  masterful, surprising, and deeply moving pair of performances. Rocky and Mickey are damaged people who don’t know how to trust or feel hope again…yet the two men come together as the camera pans out to a wide shot on the streets, without any words at all. Its beautiful. You could cry right there. I hope this scene, and Burgess Meredith in particular, won an award. [pullquote]It’s that good. You feel you’ve witnessed a great moment in cinema.[/pullquote]

Here’s a video of this duology of monologues. Watch this again, because scenes like this don’t come around very often: 

I had no idea Rocky was a good movie, let alone a great one, which puts me in my place. It’s got seven sequels for a reason. (Maybe I need to see the first Fast and Furious, by my logic?) 😉

Many iconic moments stood out that I only absorbed through pop culture til now:  when Rocky cracks five raw eggs into a glass and sloppily gulps it down. When Rocky, trying  to make a point with Paulie, beats up a side of beef so furiously that he breaks its ribs. When Rocky runs through the streets of Philly, pre-morning, and triumphs over the stairs that left him winded earlier, as the Rocky theme song we all love crescendos all around, Rocky’s arms making a V to the skies as the dawn emerges from the night. (I’ve got goosebumps remembering this.)

The training montage scene that should never be considered a Peetime:

And then, of course, the climax: Rocky blinded, bloody, and beaten, calls plaintively for Adrian. When she makes it through the throng, I thought this would be the time to say they love each other, which they do. I lapped up every second of that. Remember when this film came out in 1976, audiences were still hopeful movies would leave them happier than when they came in. Now we are cynical and a bit jaded, so it’s nice to see an early film that awards the viewers for their patience, as a slow tale reaches a beautiful conclusion.

I think the only reason this film doesn’t get a Plus on that A, is from the confusing ending. Who won the fight? I have no idea from watching it. I asked my mother, also watching, who won and she had no clue either. Nobody was punched out on the ground. We re-wound the scene and still didn’t understand what happened, although I could barely make it out that Apollo Creed mumbled something about a re-match. So, was it a tie?

I texted a friend and asked WHO WON IN ROCKY? He said Creed did, from “points” — and the denouement is about Creed respecting Rocky enough to give him a real chance for the title next year. Or something like that? When I watch Rocky II I might understand better, but I think it’s unforgivable to keep your non-sport oriented viewers this confused. At that time in movie history, sequels were not much of a thing, so this might have left us confused forever. I don’t mind him not winning: I just want to know what happened without asking the Wikipedia. (It turns out they professed love and a vow to not have a re-match? I am not sure how I’m supposed to know this from watching it on film.)

There’s a nice bit of background to Rocky: Stallone himself wrote it, and the story says he was down to around $106 left to his name. The studios offered him $300, 000 for the script and wanted to put someone like Burt Reynolds in the role. Stallone turned it down, insisting that he should star in it. The rest, I guess, is history, as per Wikipedia:

The film, made on a budget of just over $1 million, was a sleeper hit; it earned $225 million in global box office receipts, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1976, and went on to win three Oscars, including Best Picture. The film received many positive reviews and turned Stallone into a major star.[4] In 2006, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”. Rocky is considered to be one of the greatest sports films ever made and was ranked as the second-best in the genre, after Raging Bull, by the American Film Institute in 2008.

Movie Grade: A

The Rocky theme music for your nostalgic enjoyment, and good luck getting it out of your head:

PS: I’ve started noticing the use of holidays in films. Well, in this case, Rocky could be called both a Thanksgiving movie and a Christmas flick. Pay attention the next time you watch it. 🙂


Here are our detailed Rocky I–Creed II reviews, from a Rocky Virgin who’d never seen any of the films  in the franchise before.

Some related reviews we think you’ll like:

Movie Review – Creed II

Movie Review – The Meg

Movie Rewatch — Jaws

Virgin Movie Binge Review – Rocky V

Rocky V picked right back up after the last fight in Russia. He returns to America, and we learn Rocky has developed traumatic brain injury from the culmination of head impacts over the years, including his most recent fight with Ivan Drago. Rocky can no longer fight due to this, and must officially retire.

We also learn that Rocky’s accountant poorly handled Rocky’s finances, and so the family is forced to sell all of their things and move back to Rocky‘s original neighborhood. In order to make ends meet, Rocky opens the boxing gym where he first started.

I think this is also Rocky’s way of staying connected to a sport that he can no longer participate in. All the while, he is pressured by Duke to fight the current Heavyweight Champion for a significant amount of money. Rocky reluctantly begins training Tommy Gunn, who is an up-and-coming fighter. Rocky begins living through Tommy with each win, and Tommy begins to resent Rocky because he feels Rocky is using him to remain relevant. Against, Rocky’s wishes, Tommy partners with Duke to fight the current World Heavyweight Champ. Upon winning the title, Tommy learns that the fight was set up and no one truly considers him the World Heavyweight Champion…because the previous Champion never won the title from Rocky. Determined to prove himself, Tommy instigates a street fight with Rocky.

I enjoyed the fight scenes of Rocky in this movie. Rocky is never seen in the ring because he has officially lost his boxing license, due to his injury. I love any fight scene that Rocky is a part of, because it is almost always a fight that has passion. What motivates Rocky the most is defending something. In Rocky I and II he was defending himself as having the ability to be a professional boxer. In Rocky III, he felt the need to honor Mickey, who he believes died prematurely thinking Rocky had won the fight. In Rocky IV, Rocky is defending Creed who was killed in the ring by Ivan Drago. And in this movie, Rocky is fighting Tommy Gunn to show that Tommy doesn’t have what it takes to be the World Heavyweight Champion — because he lacks heart and passion.

There’s a lot of character development in this movie with Rocky. Rocky initially pretends that he’s okay moving back to his old neighborhood, but he misses the luxuries he once had. He believes that he’s fallen from Grace. In all of the previous movies, I never believe Rocky to be attached to money or fame. Even in the second movie, he squandered all of his money on those around him, and went back to working in a butcher shop.

I honestly think Rocky became attached to that lifestyle due to Creed’s influence. His lack of money affects him so much that he truly consider Duke’s offer to fight, in order to get back on top–both financially and in name. He also got attached to an unappreciative leech like Tommy, which caused a break in his family. Though the Tommy Gunn/Duke pair were subpar antagonists, I believe their parts were a necessary evil to bring Rocky back to the understanding that family is where his life and heart lie.

Grade: B

Movie Review – Creed II

Movie Review - Creed III really enjoyed this movie. I had very high expectations and lots of excitement when I walked into the theater, and I think this movie delivered on all of those expectations. I think this movie kept a lot of new fans from Creed I, but  also tapped into the older fan-base from Rocky IV.

This movie was similar to the Rocky movies, but is trying to become its own thing. We can see that in the scenes when Rocky doesn’t stand in the spotlight with Adonis. I think that’s a good indicator that the directors and writers are trying to make a separation between this second generation and the parent movies of Rocky.

I think what makes a Rocky movie so memorable has a lot to do with what’s happening outside of the boxing storyline. From the proposal, to the pregnancy, to the early fatherhood challenges, I think this movie had a lot of moments that touched the hearts of the audience.

I think the part about Creed II that I had never seen in a previous Rocky movie was the portrayal of the opponent, which in this case was Viktor and Ivan Drago. The movie starts out with scenes of them, instead of scenes of Adonis and Rocky. I think throughout the movie there were very important scenes of Viktor and Ivan that help the audience understand what this fight meant to them. For me, it made me feel compassion for Viktor and Ivan Drago. For Ivan, this fight was his way of redeeming himself from the defeat against Rocky.

In this movie, we see that there was a lot of fall out due to that loss. Ivan experienced separation from his country, his wife, and all those who supported him before he lost against Rocky. It seems that Viktor was raised with a singular goal in mind–redeem the honor of his father and win back his mother into their lives. I truly did feel for Ivan Drago because this fight was more about him than it was about Viktor. Viktor had no personal motivations for this fight except those of his father. I think the reason this movie decided to show empathy towards Viktor and Ivan is because they are not the real antagonists of the film. The real antagonist of the film is Viktor’s mother and Ivan’s former wife. Towards the end of the movie, Ivan decides that the life of his son is more important than the support of his country.

Overall this was a great movie; I like the alternative views it had and I’m excited to see what’s in store for Adonis Creed in the future. I’m also interested to see what is in store several years down the line for his daughter–Amara Creed. I think people believe she won’t be a boxer due to being born deaf, but based on the scene with her watching Adonis return to the boxing gym, I don’t believe that will stop her.

Overall: I think, as usual, both the acting of Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone were great. I would recommend this movie to anyone. I’m a true Rocky convert. It’s worth it to see it in theaters.

Grade: A-

About The Peetimes: It was easy to find 4 good Peetimes that didn’t interfere with the great boxing scenes or the relevant story line.

There are no extra scenes during, or after, the end credits of Creed II. (What we mean by Anything Extra.)

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky Balboa and Creed 1

Continuing our Binge watch of Rocky and Creed Movies with a viewing virgin! Enjoy!

Rocky Balboa

Rocky Balboa occurs several years after Rocky V. Rocky’s son has grown up and moved out of the house. Adrian died of cancer and Rocky visits her grave every day with Paulie. Paulie is the only person who is still around, but he’s getting tired of the usual routine of visiting Adrian’s grave. Rocky also owns a restaurant called Adrian’s. I think this is his only remnant of the past. Inside the restaurant he has photos of his previous fights and of his family.

This was a sad movie to watch because it seems as though Rocky is pretty lonely without boxing, Adrian, and his son. His son doesn’t come around often. I think there are some lingering feelings from Rocky V that affected their relationship.  Rocky’s son would rather not hang around Rocky due to several reasons. 1) Rocky reminds Rocky Jr. about Adrian, who is dead. 2) Rocky Jr. is resentful of Rocky because of how it affected him growing up, and continues to affect him now. Being the son of Rocky means that there are very large shoes to fill and I don’t think Rocky Jr. ever lived up to those external expectations. In large part, I think that had to do with their relationship following Tommy Gunn. Rocky focused all of his time trying to relive his old life through Tommy, and never took the time to teach his own son how to box. I think the son and society feels that he isn’t really a Balboa if he can’t fight.

Rocky earns back his license to begin boxing on a local level again. He feels that he isn’t really living and boxing will allow him to feel alive again. As usual, something occurs that pulls Rocky back into the heavyweight champion boxing world. However, the premise in this case was poor. Rocky accepts a challenge to fight Mason Dixon, the current Heavyweight Champion. This came about when a computer simulation between Rocky and Mason deemed Rocky as the winner. Despite everyone being against the idea, Rocky proceeds with the fight and loses. In his heart, he really won because he proved to himself that he is still a worthy opponent.

Overall, I didn’t like this movie because Rocky didn’t go into the fight with a solid resolve. I did like that this fight brought Rocky and Rocky Jr. closer to having the bond that they both wish they always had. Though this was sweet — I don’t think it was enough to carry the movie.

Quiz  question: What can you count on to happen in a Rocky film?

Answer:

  1. Rocky runs up the stairs or a tall structure
  2. Rocky throws his fist in the air

  3. “Eye of The Tiger” or “Gonna Fly Now” plays

  4. Rocky gets beat up initially in his fights and then makes a come back

  5. All of the Above

  6. None of the Above

(Answer is E!)

Movie Grade: C

Creed

I initially watched Creed back when it first came out in 2015. As I mentioned at the beginning of my Rocky binge journey, I didn’t know much about Rocky. After watching all of the Rocky films, and then rewatching Creed, I have a greater understanding and appreciation for this movie. When I first watched Creed, I didn’t  comprehend the significance of the title–Creed. I think I would have been so much more excited to see this movie if I was a long time Rocky fan, because this movie comes 30 years after Apollo Creed dies. So I would have thought to myself, what could this movie be about??

Now that I’ve seen Rocky, I have all of this information that I can apply to this movie. Specific scenes are more meaningful to me and jokes are funnier. Specifically when Rocky gives Adonis Creed the American flag shorts for his fight. I understand that those were the style of shorts that Apollo Creed fought most of his fights in.

This movie reminded me of the original Rocky because it offered a lot of character development to understand the character of Adonis Creed. Adonis Creed has characteristics of both Rocky and Apollo. Specifically, he grew up poor and an orphan, until he was adopted, where he began living a much more lavish lifestyle. This lavish upbringing wasn’t enough for him, because he still believed his calling was to be a boxer. I think like a true boxer, he was willing to give up everything in order to pursue his passion. I also think Adonis Creed is what Rocky Jr. could have been, if he wanted to make a name for himself outside of being Rocky’s son. Adonis grew up knowing who his father was, and I think that was his reasoning for becoming a boxer; however he wanted to make a name for himself that was not associated with Apollo.

I really like this movie, because I think this is who Rocky was meant to train. To me, this movie feels like a redo of Rocky V.  Rocky gets the opportunity to train the son Creed never knew he had, and in some ways it’s as though he has his friend back. I also like that this movie didn’t focus too heavily on Rocky, but kept true to its name and allowed Adonis Creed to be the star.  Though this is a continuation of the Rocky series, I feel like it’s also its own movie because it didn’t follow the patterns of Rocky exactly, and in fact broke many of the things that we’re used to seeing in Rocky. For instance, many of the answers from the Rocky quiz would not apply to this movie.  Nonetheless, this was a great movie and I am very very very excited to see Creed II, especially knowing what I know from Rocky IV.

Movie Grade:  B+

Thanks for sticking around for my first-time viewing of the entire Rocky franchise! I look forward to seeing Creed II tonite! My final review will be posted soon, after I add the Peetimes (of course).

Virgin Watch Movie Reviews — Rocky 1 and 2

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky 3 and 4

Here’s our original review when Creed first came out: 

Movie Review – Creed

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky 3 and 4

Continuing our Rocky-through-Creed binge newbie watch, here are our reviews for Rocky 3 and 4! (Spoilers!)

Rocky III (1982)

Rocky III started out with a montage of all the fights that Rocky has had since we last saw him. Rocky is doing well. He lives in a large house with his family and Mickey. Just as Rocky is about to retire at the unveiling of his statue, Clubber Lang challenges Rocky to a  fight.

Rocky discovers that Mickey has been setting up fights with weaker opponents so that Rocky can retain his title and retire as the world heavyweight champion. Learning this, Rocky accepts the challenge in order to prove that he is still the best. He goes into the fight with little preparation. This reminds me of Apollo Creed and his initial fight with Rocky. Apollo Creed was cocky and he thought that the fight was not very serious. Rocky walked into this fight in a similar way. This was coupled with the distraction from a prior brawl that left Mickey injured. Rocky loses the fight in the second round. The rest of the movie is based on this premise, which allows Creed to step up to train Rocky for a rematch.

In regards to Clubber Lang, I think he was a poor antagonist. For the first time I’m disappointed with the character development. I felt Clubber Lang was a one-dimensional character. He was always angry, but it wasn’t exactly clear why. I think they could have done a better job explaining who this character was.

I have a few thoughts about Creed and his offer to train Rocky after Mickey dies. I think it can either be viewed as admirable or self centered. I think it was great for Creed to understand the circumstances in which Rocky lost the fight, and offer to be his guidance in the rematch. I think it is admirable because it takes a certain person to approach their former adversary and offer to help them.

On the other hand, I believe that this can be seen as vain and self-centered, because Creed could be offering to train Rocky because he needs Rocky to win, which in turn will save his reputation. He is afraid the world will believe that if Rocky could be defeated by such a weak opponent, then maybe Rocky wasn’t a worthy opponent for Creed. This brings Creed’s championship and prior status into question. Was Creed really the best, or was he weaker than Rocky, and can this man Clubber Lang also defeat Creed? Overall, I love that Creed chose to train Rocky, and I do believe it to be admirable and kind.

I love the scenes of them training together. I don’t think the fight scene towards the end was anything we haven’t seen before. It didn’t wow me like the scenes in Rocky I or Rocky II. And as predicted, Rocky wins the fight with Clubber Lang easily. I like that at the end of Rocky III we see Rocky and Creed going into a friendly battle, which is an optimistic foreshadowing of their future relationship.

Movie Grade:  B-

Rocky IV

In Rocky IV, we see that Rocky’s life continues to be good. Rocky retired as the World Heavyweight Champion, and he is still very good friends with Creed. We see Russia has entered the boxing league with the rest of the world. Creed sees that Ivan Drago is the current champion in Russia, and looks to take on a worthy American opponent. Creed immediately steps up to the challenge.

Within the first 15 minutes of this movie, I’m already intrigued. This is a major improvement from the last movie. Ivan Drago is a worthy opponent. He is no regular sized man. In the fact, he is several feet taller than Rocky and Creed, and he weighs more. This makes me wonder if there are weight cut-offs in boxing, like how there are in wrestling.

Creed feels this is his chance to prove to the world that he is still a great fighter. In typical Creed fashion, he taunts and mocks Drago to get him riled up for the fight. Creed is such an entertainer in my eyes. He’s a great and amazing fighter as well, but he always underestimates a fight, especially with an unknown opponent.

Even though everyone tells Creed that he’s been retired for a long time, and to fight such a physically intimidating opponent is not a smart choice, Creed is stubborn and prideful, and refuses to back down. What puzzles me the most is how Creed could approach this opponent without training. At first, I thought this was more typical of Creed because he is a cocky individual. However, once the fight starts, it is clear that Creed believed the fight would be more of a joke than a serious competition. Creed put on a giant pre-fight spectacle of America against Russia. This definitely embarrassed Drago, to the point he felt he needed to fight so hard that no one would ever laugh at him again. Drago goes into the fight seriously attacking Creed. Everyone is scared and Rocky tries to stop the fight, but Creed insists that he does not stop. Creed can’t keep up, and ultimately suffers a fatal blow to the head, which kills him in the ring. Everyone is devastated, and Rocky makes it his mission to avenge Creed by fighting Drago in Russia.

In the next chunk of the movie, Rocky leaves his family behind to head to Russia with Creed’s coach to train for the fight. When Rocky sets his mind to something, there’s no stopping him. He really is invested. This is understandable. Rocky just lost his good friend and former coach for a fight that was unnecessary. Though his reasoning is understandable and Rocky fully prepares for the fight, I still think fighting Drago is a dumb idea. Rocky is retired. He’s not as young as Drago. He’s physically smaller than Drago. And doesn’t Rocky still have problems seeing out of his right eye??

The fight between Rocky and Drago was difficult to watch. He had a whole country against him. I was afraid for Rocky’s life. Rocky, as usual, takes a beating, and it’s difficult for him to fight back due to drastic height difference. When Rocky wins the fight, he also wins over the hearts of most of the crowd and gives a unifying speech. I think it was pretty obvious that this movie drew from situations that were occurring in the real world between the United States and Russia. I think this is what made this fight so interesting to watch.

After Rocky I and II, this is my favorite Rocky film.

Movie Grade: A

Stay tuned for the next set of movies in this series!

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews — Rocky 1 and 2

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky Balboa and Creed 1

Here’s our original review when Creed first came out: 

Movie Review – Creed

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews — Rocky 1 and 2

creed 2
Let the games begin…

Rocky is something I’ve heard about for all my life, but to be honest, I had never seen any Rocky films. The first Rocky related movie I watched was Creed in 2015, and I thought it was a pretty good movie. Now, as Creed 2 is about to be released, I took on a project to watch all of the Rocky films.  (We’ll enter this movie binge in two movie increments.)

Rocky (1976)

Wow! I am truly amazed at how amazing this movie is. I’m also really surprised at how a movie that is now more than 40 years old has such a great storyline and cinematography. I can only imagine how viewers at the time felt about it.

I think this first movie did character development very well. I think that Rocky is a very charismatic, charming, and funny character. He really allowed me to get sucked into the movie and really feel for the character of Rocky. In terms of movie theme, for a sports film about boxing there was very little time spent boxing. I will say that the boxing scenes were spectacular. I was cheering from my couch!

On top of this, I learned so much from Rocky: 1) A split decision does not mean it’s a tie! 2) There were 15 rounds (then) in a boxing match. 3) If a boxer is down for 10 seconds, then the other boxer wins the whole match (not just that round). 4) Rocky is a South Paw. Which means his left hand is his dominant fighting hand.

One question still unanswered: did Adrian truly believe that Rocky could hear her through the crowd and the reporters swarming him?? 🤔

Grade: A

Stay tuned for Rocky II. I’ll be adding these reviews here as I binge through the franchise.

Rocky II

The beginnings of this movie were exciting because it gave a recap of the previous movie. I think that’s a pretty cool technique. Even though I am binge watching and my memory of Rocky I is still fresh, I still found it helpful. I think many viewers would appreciate if all movies gave a recap of the previous movie, especially if a few years have passed.

This movie picked right back up where the last one ended. There’s a lot of scenes that don’t seem relevant to boxing in the beginning of this movie. About half of the movie is about character development and build up for the rematch between Rocky and Creed. It isn’t until an hour in until a rematch is even set. If Rocky wasn’t such an entertaining character this would have deterred me from continuing the movie.

The first half of the movie, Rocky carelessly spends his money and attempts to film commercials. But during the commercial filming, everyone learns that Rocky can’t read, which I think is the main driver for Rocky’s boxing interest in the first place. In this movie, Rocky isn’t too interested in boxing because he’s already proven that he can box to himself, but due to his inability to read and find a decent job, he feels he has no other option. The way he spends his money also adds to the storyline and to the character development of Rocky. He’s never had this much money before and yet he’s not afraid to spend on those who he loves. I find that to be pretty selfless. I also see more character development with Adrian in this movie. Frankly, I wasn’t too sure of Adrian’s purpose in the first movie, specifically because she didn’t have many lines, but as I continue watching, I see that her character is just shy and is slowly becoming her own woman.

When Rocky finally decides to go up against Creed again, I learned he has a significant blind spot in his right eye. He’s determined to fight, so he trained to use his right hand. Remembering that Rocky is a South Paw, I find this to be one heck of a strategy and also is very inspiring.

The funniest scene in my opinion is when Rocky stops to see his priest before his fight. He’s already late, but he drives up to the priest’s window and yells to ask for a blessing.

The fight scene at the end rivaled an actual fight, because it was longer and it wasn’t only a bunch of clips strung together. During the fight scene, Creed really brings his all. This isn’t a joke to him anymore, because Rocky has shaken his confidence in his title. I wasn’t too sure how things would end, and during that final round both Creed and Rocky got knocked down. I was once again on the edge of my seat. I wasn’t sure the direction the fight would go. I thought for sure Rocky was going to lose, and that would be the premise of Rocky III. What I loved most about this movie was the twist at the end, when everyone waits to see who will stand up in time.

Honestly, I have so much respect for both Rocky and Creed. You could see the exhaustion in both of them, but they both refused to give up.

Here’s a quiz question for the next time: What can you count on to happen in a Rocky film?

Grade: A

Stay tuned for the answer and for Rocky III!

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky 3 and 4

Virgin Movie Binge Reviews – Rocky Balboa and Creed 1

And here is our original review when Creed first came out:

Movie Review – Creed

Movie Review – Creed

It must be true that practice makes perfect, because Sylvester Stallone gave a remarkable performance as the aged Rocky. Just because an actor might have started out a little rough around the edges, or because they are typecast into a narrow range of roles, doesn’t mean that they can’t act. Given the right material, Stallone can do it as well as the best.

Michael Jordan (No not that one, the other one) was very good as Adonis Creed.

The fight scene choreography was well done, but didn’t equal that of other similar films.

The only things I didn’t like about the movie were were the romance and the training montages. I felt like the writers were determined to force a romantic subplot into the movie just to give it a little more symmetry with the first Rocky movie, and the training montages were just sort of bland. Of course I’m jaded, because the training montages in the early Rocky movies are legendary, but still.

By the way, pay attention to the throwaway line Rocky says at the end as they climb the steps, and remember that the name of the theme song in the first Rocky movie is “Gonna Fly Now.”

Movie Grade: B+