Welcome to the Spider-Verse

It doesn’t matter how much they switch up the mask: Spiderman still looks like Deadpool.

Captain Midnight makes some intelligent videos for superhero nerds like us.  In this one,  he talks about how the upcoming animated reboot of the Spiderman universe is both an exciting prospect and a scary one. We’ve had a lot of Spidermen in the modern era, which speaks to the enduring popularity and relatable personality of Peter Parker.

For what it’s worth,  some of those movie installments were pretty good (like SpiderMan 2), and others were stinky turds (like Spiderman 3).

Now that the Marvel Cinematic Universe hit a home-run with Homecoming, Sony (together with the non-MCU Marvel)  is eyeing the rest of their arachnoid stable with greedy eyes. In the trailer for Into the Spiderverse, we’re shown an older Peter Parker, a young new POC Spiderman, and a Gwen Stacey black-and-white version of Spidergirl. And it looks like a whole colony of superpowered spiderfolk check in.

Early perceptions from most comic-book fans are giddily positive. The film’s upcoming narrative seems to hew more closely to the comic book storylines than any of the live-action features did.

I like the idea of a grown man version of Peter Parker counseling a new super spider hero. In theory. We just had this kind of material  covered with Iron Man and the MCU’s Spidey. I assume the writers have something different in mind.

We still don’t know yet how this Peter will be written, but I hope he’s retained an overzealous enthusiasm for his freewheeling, freelancing, webslinging job. I’m tired of seeing beloved superheroes grow grim, moody, and morose with time. Please keep my Spidey fun!

One note: I have to say the animation for the film looks really darned cool.

So, is the Spiderverse more about cashing in on the MCU’s approval ratings, or adding a legit fresh, exciting take on Spiderpeople?

Watch this insightful video to develop your own spidey sense of how the upcoming Into The Spiderverse is shaping up.

 

How Marvel’s Spiderman Fixed the Franchise

He’s the only superhero from Queens, far as I know.

How many Spideys have graced (or disgraced) (or Topher Graced) the iconic young superhero on the big screen over the last few decades? This is the THIRD go at it in the modern era — but you probably knew that. How come Tom Holland’s performance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is considered superior?

This video (12 minutes in length) details a bit of Spiderman history, some words about Spiderman’s mask vs Peter Parker’s eyes, the importance of not dragging your viewers through the same origin moments over and over (ie – the spider bite, the death of Uncle Ben)…and a lot of cool tidbits you probably didn’t know about our favorite arachnid-themed teen hero:

Movie Review – Spider-Man Homecoming

Definitely one of the better Avenger movies, and I would say it’s easily the best *Spider-Man* of the bunch. This is a much lighter film than its predecessors. There was laughter throughout the movie, with a few really hilarious moments.

The acting was superb. Tom Holland, as the Spider-Man, was delightful. Michael Keaton (Vulture) brought a depth to his character that was both likable and terrorizing.

The story had some predictability to it, but this *is* an origins tale. We’ve seen so many of these — even several *Spider-Man* origins — that it’s hard to do something fresh and still take the time to develop a worthy villain.

I think the problem with all the previous *Spider-Man* movies was that he was alone in his universe, as the only superhero – a problem created by *Sony* owning the movie rights. Now that Spider-Man is wrapped up in the Avenger’s universe, he can be the kid we want to see grow up, instead of instantly having to be “the man.”

In this installment, Peter Parker is 15. I hope we get to see at least two more solo Spider-Man movies with him in high school, exploring smaller adventures in his neighborhood, instead of constantly trying to save the city or planet.

Grade: A-