Dances with Gophers – Video & Lyrics to I’m Alright from Caddyshack

dancing gopher from caddyshack. I'm all right by kenny loggins
We can kill all the gophers. We don’t even have to have a reason.

People have been asking about my morning playlist, and Kenny Loggins’ I’m Alright from the  1980 classic Caddyshack is one of the few songs that helps me wake up and feel ready to strap on another day.

As my job and life centers around movies, my playlists tend to reflect the kind of songs that perfectly fit a film scene I recall. (On another note, isn’t it interesting that two of my favorite Bill Murray movies have him battling a rodent? And yes, gophers and groundhogs are both in the family Rodentia.)

With no further idle thoughts, here’s the world’s most famous dancing gopher in his movie debut, followed by the lyrics of this jaunty little tune:

I admit the I love the sound of the water sprinklers sounding like a shaker instrument as the film opens over the quiet morning’s golf fields. That sort of creativity makes me strangely happy.

The Caddyshack lyrics to sing along to:


I’m Alright

(As sang by Kenny Loggins)

I’m alright
Nobody worry ’bout me
Why you got to gimme a fight?
Can’t you just let it be?
I’m alright
Don’t nobody worry ’bout me
You got to gimme a fight
Why don’t you just let me be
Do what you like,
Doing it nat’rally
But if it’s too easy
They’re gonna disagree
It’s your life
And isn’t it a mystery
If it’s nobody’s bus’ness
It’s everybody’s gameGotta catch you later
No, no, cannonball it right away
Some Cinderella kid
Get it up and get you a job
(Dip dip dip dip dip dip dip dip)I’m alright
Nobody worry ’bout me
Why you got to gimme a fight?
Can’t you just let it be?
I’m alright
Don’t nobody worry ’bout me
You got to gimme a fight
Why don’t you just let me beWho do you want?
Who you be today?
And who is it really
Makin’ up your mind?You want to listen to the man?
Pay attention to the magistrate
And while I got you in the mood…
Listen to your
Own heart beatin’
Own heart beatin’
Own heart beatin’
Own heart beatin’Don’t it get you movin’
mmmmm-man
It make me feel good
Then give it up and give it the job

I’m alright
Nobody worry ’bout me
Why you got to gimme a fight?
Can’t you just let it be?
I’m alright
Don’t nobody worry ’bout me
You got to gimme a fight
Why don’t you just let me be
I’m alright
Nobody worry ’bout me
Why you got to gimme a fight?
Can’t you just let it be?
I’m alright
I’m alright
Just let me be…

(Songwriters: Kenneth Clark Loggins © 1980, Gnossos Music / Milk Money Music)


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Ring in the New Year With Harry and Sally

when harry met sally is a perfect news years even film
Harry, meeting Sally again, just in time. Darn it, there’s something in my eye. 😉

I know there’s more than one movie associated with New Year’s Eve than When Harry Met Sally, but at the moment I can’t think of anything better. And on a re-watch, it still stands up beautifully through time. Ever meet someone you can’t stand at one point in your life, but grow on you through time? That’s kind of the lovely premise at work between Harry and Sally.

It happens with movies too. All the time, especially in the business of RunPee (we’ve seen around 1500 movies over the last ten years): I’ll see something I wasn’t impressed with, then it will come around my radar later, and I’ll be surprised at how good that film really is. Sometimes it’s something nuts, like Monty Python’s Holy Grail (once I memorized the lines, things took on a whole new world of fun), or something with action or sci-fi (like Pacific Rim or Independence Day). Sometimes I’m too young to appreciate a great movie, like I finally noticed on this year’s rewatch of Jaws and Rocky. If you haven’t seen those in a while, give them another watch. There are moments in each that are pure gold, never completely replicated since.

But it’s New Year’s Eve, so back to Harry & Sally. They took most of a lifetime to become ready for each other.  Their enmity was almost instant as they left college to begin their adult lives. They kept bumping into each other, with a visceral reaction every time. That should have told them something right there. Even bad chemistry is chemistry. Eventually they worked it into friendship, then screwed that up because the timing with people is rarely right, and finally we’ve got the scene at the very end with Harry tearing across New York City to be there for his obvious life partner before the clock hits midnight.

I always tear up a bit at the end. Those crazy kids. I love the bookend ‘interviews’ with the couples. It’s a sweet little film.

If you’re not heading out on the town to drink and dance (and hopefully not drive), consider sticking When Harry Met Sally back in the DVD player.

We’re running a poll on Best New Year’s Eve movies on Twitter right now. Get your vote in this week, or wait to see how the results turn out. And to you and your family, have a safe and joyous New Year! Auld Lang Syne — whatever that means. Sally tells us it’s something about old friends. Awwwww.

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Movie Review — Titanic

Is there any movie more touching and exciting than Titanic? And the first time you watch it, it’s completely unexpected. I didn’t even want to see this in the theater, and resisted for months. Fool that I am, I figured, “Yeah, it sinks. I know what happens. Why see it?

I was never so glad to be so wrong. The hype was deserved. The small, interpersonal story is so damn good you even forget the ship is going down forever, that thousands of people will die in sub-freezing water for no other reason than White Star Lines’ vanity. Man, I sobbed for the entire final act at my first viewing. Some scenes — like seeing the old couple, terrified, holding each other in bed as the waters rise — still make the tears flow. And I hold my breath as Rose and Jack do on the far stern, when they are sucked into the ocean. (We’ll just call that my 4D interactive experience. I do this in The Abyss too.)

The heart of the story is Rose and Jack: actors DiCaprio and Winslet exhibit charming charisma, chemistry, and commitment to their forbidden inter-class love affair.

The sparkling James Horner soundtrack helps, as well as the indelible visuals of the gigantic, “unsinkable” ship. The big screen viewing’s sense of scale draws you right now. DVDs don’t do it justice.

Bill Paxton’s framing story adds the perfect storytelling device, bridging past and present in a poignant way, making the heroes, villains, and tragic deaths more meaningfully real. The old decayed ship on the sea floor morphs into the Ship of Dreams, where the “the china had never been used. The sheets had never been slept in. ” You just get chills. It’s a storytelling triumph: James Cameron went to extraordinary lengths (and expense) to film the actual submerged remains, bringing us to that forbidding, painful, fascinating setting.

This sh!t happened. A cascade of small mistakes, human hubris, and major design oversights led to over 1500 people dying horribly, unnecessarily, in the far North Pacific on April 15, 1912.

Through the fabulous medium of movies, at their best, you get to feel and care for real history, even if the two main characters here are fictional. I love this movie so much that I now devour any books, movies, or museum exhibits on the Titanic. Yes, I do.

Does this movie need RunPee? Um, do sharks swim? YES. It’s really really really long. Loooooong. So long that it needs two DVDs to play on a home theater. If Titanic came out now, we’d probably have to have four or more Peetimes…a human bladder can only go so long. (But my heart will go on…)

Movie Grade – A+

Movie Review – The Terminator

He came back.

The Terminator is one of the truly perfect films in the science fiction genre. Sure, there are temporal paradox/causality loop issues, but you have to handwave that and go along with the premise. And why not? If you’re going to tell a time travel story about what happens when the singularity occurs — and it turns out AI cyborgs decide to eradicate Man — it doesn’t get better than this. Argue all you like, Asimov fans. 😉

This is heart-pounding action with a bit of sweet, wistful romance, some humor, magnificent chase scenes, a great urban 1980s setting, fatal mistakes by a rookie Sarah Connor, sardonic wisdom from the young, war-hardened time traveler, and a really scary unstoppable killing machine.

Everyone showed a spirited commitment to their unlikely roles. There are some interesting early ‘cameos’, like Bill Paxton as a young punk. I still have a crush on Michael Biehn’s Kyle Reese (who played the equally awesome but essentially same character in the fantastically-scary-but-delicious Aliens film), and Linda Hamilton will always be my Sarah Connor. Finally, Arnold, as the Terminator, was a revelation (his entire acting and subsequent political career really kicked off right here).

Some lines might be hokey to modern ears, but I love it all, after all this time, and quote them in daily life. (Here’s three quotes, offhand: “Come with me if you want to live.” “That’s what he does! That’s ALL he does!… And he absolutely will not stop…ever, until you are dead!” And, of course, “I’ll be back.” Duh.)

There’s also an interestingly mechanized score by Brad Fiedel, with the subtle thrumming theme of the Terminator lingering as an iconic sound, recognizable through the entire franchise. (We can debate the various merits of the other Terminator movies/TV shows in the comments section below.)

When the exoskeletal version of the T-800 rises from the flames, it’s a horrifying moment. (Although, if you were aware at all of James Cameron movies, you would expect his signature ‘fake-out’ endings. But hey, they do work.) The scene where a wounded Sarah kills the crawling death robot is gripping, chilling, and deeply satisfying. (“You’re terminated, f@cker.” Yeah.)

The final moment in Mexico is superbly understated, ominous, frightening, and strangely hopeful. “There’s a storm coming.” “I know.” And now I have goosebumps. An enduring film, worthy of RunPee’s Classic Movie Hits List.

Movie Grade – A+